ListOnline, Inc.'s Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Policy:
ListOnline, Inc., commonly doing business as “ListOnline” and “ListOnline.com” and its affiliated brands as they may be created or dissolved from time to time, (collectively “ListOnline Companies,” or “ListOnline”), is committed to providing fair and equitable service, including housing opportunities, in a manner that is free from unlawful discrimination of any kind. Employees, contractors, and representatives of ListOnline, and licensees who partner with ListOnline, must abide by ListOnline’s fair housing policy at all times, which means, at a minimum, complying with all federal, state and local fair housing laws. ListOnline has zero tolerance for violations of fair housing laws and strictly prohibits discrimination in the provision of any of ListOnline’s services on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, familial status (including pregnancy, or having children), age, national origin, citizenship or immigration status, the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability including recovering from substance abuse, honorably discharged veteran or military status, source of income (including receipt of income from federal, state and local housing assistance programs, housing choice vouchers, emergency assistance payments, Social Security Supplemental Security Income, unemployment insurance payments, alimony, veterans’ benefits, and disability benefits payments), or any other class protected under state, federal and local laws. Prohibited practices may include, but are not limited to: Denying professional services based on a person being a member of a protected class. Being a party to any plan or agreement to discriminate based on a person being a member of a protected class. Refusing to show or sell a property to a person because that person is a member of a protected class. Refusing to list or show a property in a particular geographic area because of the presence or absence of members of protected classes in that area. Representing that a property is or is not available for sale, when the property is in fact available, to a member of a protected class, because of that person’s membership in a protected class. Providing inaccurate or incomplete information about a property to a person because that person is a member of a protected class. Different treatment or disparate treatment to persons based on their membership in a protected class. Steering or guiding potential homebuyers to selected properties or areas based on their membership in, or non-membership in, a protected class, or based on their perceived desire to live in an area based on the presence or absence of members of protected classes in that area. Any statement (including in advertising, marketing, property listings, etc.), whether direct or indirect, that discriminates or otherwise expresses any preference or limitation based on someone’s membership in, or non-membership in, a protected class. Marketing or targeting service based on people’s membership or non-membership in a protected class. Harassment based on a person’s membership in a protected class. Applying different, or more burdensome criteria to individuals based on their membership in a protected class. Retaliating against a person for reporting a discriminatory practice, or for participating in an investigation into alleged discrimination. Blockbusting, which is defined as any illegal, discriminatory practice whereby an agent induces a property owner to list her property by suggesting that people of a particular protected characteristic are about to move into the neighborhood. Employees, contractors, licensees and representatives of ListOnline, Inc. are prohibited from engaging in any conduct in violation of this policy and may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination, for violations of this policy. Laws That Protect You Federal and state fair housing laws were put into effect to create an even playing field for homebuyers in all areas of a real estate transaction. These laws prohibit discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex (including gender identity and sexual orientation), disability, familial status, and national origin. Civil Rights Act of 1866 The federal Civil Rights Act of 1866 prohibits discrimination in housing because of race or color in the sale or rental of property. This Act provided for private rights of action, but there were no federal enforcement provisions. Civil Rights Act of 1968 and 1988 Amendment In leading or selling residential property, the Civil Rights Act of 1968 expands the definition of discrimination to include not only race, but also national origin, color, and religion. The Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 further broadens the definition to include age, sex, and handicapped status. Fair Housing Act The federal Fair Housing Act of 1988 and Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 constitute the Fair Housing Act. The Act makes fair housing a national policy throughout the U.S. It prohibits discrimination in the sale, lease or rental of housing, or making housing otherwise unavailable because of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin. Americans with Disabilities Act Title III of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in commercial facilities and places of public accommodation. Equal Credit Opportunity Act The federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act makes it unlawful to discriminate against anyone on a credit application due to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age or because all or part of an applicant’s income comes from any public assistance program. Know Your Rights and Responsibilities Home sellers, prospective homebuyers, real estate agents, mortgage brokers and loan officers all have rights and responsibilities under the law. Sellers’ Responsibilities As a home seller or landlord, you are obligated not to discriminate in the sale, rental or financing of your property on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin. Also, you cannot do so through your licensed broker or salesperson, who is also bound by anti-discrimination laws. You may not set any discriminatory terms or conditions in a purchase contract or a lease. Additionally, you may not deny that housing is available or advertise a property’s availability only to persons of a certain race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin. Real Estate Professionals’ Responsibilities Real Estate agents, mortgage brokers and loan officers in a real estate transaction may not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin. Equally as important, they may not follow such instructions from a home seller or landlord. What To Do if You Feel the Law Has Been Violated Discrimination complaints about housing may be filed with the nearest office of the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) or by calling HUD’s telephone numbers, 202-708-1112 (Voice) or 202-708-1455 (TTY). Or contact HUD on the Internet at http://www.hud.gov
© 2024 ListOnline. All rights reserved.